Forensic Oral Pathology Journal - FOPJ (eISSN 2027-7628)
 

 
 

REFERENCES BY ARTICLE ID - FOPJ00012

Forensic Oral Pathology Journal - FOPJ
Volume 2 Number 3. Published in March 2011 (eISSN 2027-7628)
Copyright © Syllaba Press International Inc. 2009-2012 ®. All rights reserved.

The FOPJ in 2012 publisher three issues per year in March, July and November by Syllaba Press International Inc., Suite 722-4586, 1900 N. W. 97th Avenue, Doral, Florida 33172, USA. Article of Reflections, Case Reports, Original Articles, Short Communication, Subject Revision, Legislation and An Image in Forensic Oral Pathology may be in Spanish or English Languages.

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